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Episode 16

| December 7, 2022

The need for an all-channels approach to SEO

SEO shouldn’t be siloed. Mordy and Crystal discuss how SEOs should think about social media teams, branding, and other marketing channels.

Organic search is just one channel to bring traffic and revenue to a website. What works for one channel may or may not work on another, but you’ll never know if you don’t communicate with the rest of the marketing team.

Your website should be considered the HQ for all digital activities, and its user experience should be consistent no matter the channel a user arrives from. As a result, SEO, social media, PPC, etc., should align with consistent messaging, content, and imagery.

Depending on the size of your organization and how many hats you have to wear as a marketer, prioritization can be critical, according to iPullRank’s Garrett Sussman, featured guest on the SERP’s Up SEO Podcast. SEO may take six to 12 months to move the revenue needle, while PPC or social may be doing it today. Prioritize based on what’s driving revenue now while making time investments in other tactics for the future.

Knowing your audience is crucial when it comes to an omnichannel approach to marketing. A good way to understand who your audience is online is by using tools like SparkToro. With it, you can not only identify your audience but discover where they’re at and what they like. We’ll dive into how you can use the tool to fuel all of your marketing efforts from SEO to social!

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SERP's Up Podcast: The need for an all-channels approach to SEO with  
Garrett Sussman

This week’s guest

About

Ryan has been working in SEO for 7 years and has worked both agency-side and in-house as well as building his own websites as side projects. Currently he's focussed on growing Land of Rugs into an 8-figure revenue business, using organic growth as the vehicle for doing that. Of course, he's having fun and learning lots on the way too.

About

Ryan has been working in SEO for 7 years and has worked both agency-side and in-house as well as building his own websites as side projects. Currently he's focussed on growing Land of Rugs into an 8-figure revenue business, using organic growth as the vehicle for doing that. Of course, he's having fun and learning lots on the way too.

Transcript

Mordy Oberstein:

It's the new wave of SEO podcasting. Welcome to Surfs Up. Aloha. Mahalo for joining the Surfs Up podcast. We're pushing out some groovy new insights around what's happening in SEO. I'm Mordy Oberstein, head of SEO branding here at Wix and I'm joined by the amazing, the wonderful, the fabulous, the incredible Crystal Carter, head of SEO communications here at Wix.

Crystal Carter:

Hello, internet people. It is I. I am here. I am awake, even though I had one hour of sleep last night. That's okay.

Mordy Oberstein:

I'm totally jet lagged. I have no idea what's going on right now.

Crystal Carter:

This is going to be a completely manic episode, people. Strap in. It's about to get crazy because we're both pretty much delirious.

Mordy Oberstein:

Either that or I'm going to fall asleep in the middle of recording.

Crystal Carter:

It's fine, it's fine. Some people are really into that. They call it ASMR and people, they'll just find something and they'll crinkle it.

Mordy Oberstein:

Oh, crinkly noises. My kids are like books and they're babies, like the crinkle noise.

Crystal Carter:

Yeah, and it's a thing. People really like it. Or it's when people eat ice or something.

Mordy Oberstein:

I always found that annoying to be around people eating the ice because they're chewing on it and it's so loud.

Crystal Carter:

Oh. Oh man, oh.

Mordy Oberstein:

That wasn't going where you thought it was going.

Crystal Carter:

That's incredibly annoying.

Mordy Oberstein:

It's so annoying, right?

Crystal Carter:

I find it annoying, other people making noises. However, I do sometimes post on my Instagram, I just post pictures of waves going back and forth, for my own personal ASMR. So, yeah. I also have one of jellyfish just floating around.

Mordy Oberstein:

They are just very relaxing. It's like-

Crystal Carter:

It's very relaxing. So sometimes I just look at it.

Mordy Oberstein:

Nice. Well on that note, the Surf's Up podcast is brought to you by Wix, where you can manage so much of your entire digital marketing presence under one roof with Ascend by Wix, create videos for social, curate newsletters, set up social banners and schedule posts, plus a whole slew of marketing integrations. It's omni channel marketing with Ascend by Wix, which is very appropriate for today's show because we're talking about multiple channels and SEO.

Crystal Carter:

So all the channels-

Mordy Oberstein:

See what I did there.

Crystal Carter:

The plug, I see it.

Mordy Oberstein:

And this show's topic. Bringing you together-

Crystal Carter:

Look at that. It's almost as if you knew we would do it.

Mordy Oberstein:

Right there.

Crystal Carter:

What? What?

Mordy Oberstein:

Next level. That's right. Today's show we're talking about the vital need for an all channel approach to SEO. Why you should think about your site as your HQ for all digital activity. How to be consistent across all channels. How to align your SEO work with your other digital marketing activities and the need to consider other channels. What? Yes, to support your SEO efforts. Plus I pull ranks Garrett Sussman stops by to share how he prioritizes all of these cross channel activities and his SEO all at the same time because there's so much prioritization to do. Legit.

Also, we'll share a tool that can help you maximize your wider digital efforts. And of course we have your snappy news and who you should be following on social media for more SEO, nay more marketing awesomeness. Let's cross the channel together as episode 16 of the Surf's Up podcast has arrived.

Each week I feel like adding that last little line there, let's cross the channel together. I'm getting better and better.

Crystal Carter:

I feel like that crossing the channel, because living in England, I'm like, oh yeah, people swim across the channel and they're like, yay.

Mordy Oberstein:

That's what I was literally thinking about the English channel when I wrote that. And I'm not from England.

Crystal Carter:

Right. That's what I'm thinking. It's like, yeah, I feel like, I don't know. It was the best of search. It was the worst of search. We're getting literary people. This is high brow podcasting.

Mordy Oberstein:

My association to all this is back in, I don't know, 1920s or thirties or forties or fifties, whatever it was, people swimming across the-

Crystal Carter:

Just sometime in the 20th century.

Mordy Oberstein:

Sometime when they had black and white images and people, the people are about to jump into swim across the channel. This is my association.

Crystal Carter:

Oh yeah. And they've all got the long swimming suits and the caps.

Mordy Oberstein:

The caps.

Crystal Carter:

And they're like, oh, here I go into the sea.

Mordy Oberstein:

And here we go into cross channel SEO. SEO is amazing. We're all here for SEO. SEO is stable, long lasting organic growth, and it provides, it is good. SEO is good. However, it's really important to have a larger digital strategy that works cohesively. I think, possibly. Your sites or the sites that you work with, they all have goals and they, all those goals go well beyond Google, for example. Every site has an intended audience. And as such, you need to think about how you present yourself to them. Whether it be the tone you take on the site, how your site is constructed, the design of the website, whether it be you speak to them on social media, whether you speak to them, organic search, you have to consider all this. We know this by the way, is brand marketing and your SEO needs to align. Check this out to how the brand thinks about itself and presents itself overall.

Crystal Carter:

What?

Mordy Oberstein:

Crazy thought, right? Yes. So there's no sense in wasting time focusing on keyword opportunity if it's completely off brand or whatnot for that site.

Crystal Carter:

Indeed. And also I think that with the keywords, think about how your keywords apply to other channels as well. So people are going to be searching for those keywords. So some of the keywords that people are searching for on certain different social media platforms or other platforms might also apply to what you have on your website. If there's a hashtag that you're doing really well on TikTok or Twitter or wherever, then you might want to have a section that says, what is the hashtag about? Or include it somewhere in your copy so that people know what it is and so that people can connect it.

Mordy Oberstein:

Which is exactly the point. There's so much you need to consider for your online visibility and it all needs to work hand in hand together, SEO included. And I think it all starts with the idea or the mindset that you site is a hub or a headquarters for all of your digital activity. It's not just a place that's send traffic to Google to or from, but it's a core of everything you do with your online presence.

Crystal Carter:

Absolutely. I mean, your symbol on the mountain in terms of SEO, everything the light touches is SEO. You should be thinking about all of it as part of it, and it might seem overwhelming or something, but the way that users use the internet, it comes across from lots of different channels. So users might find you in other places, but you need to make sure that whether they find you on Facebook or Instagram or TikTok or Reddit or Twitch or wherever, or even the Amazon Marketplace for instance, that they have a place to land on that is your website.

And there's lots of different ways that you can do that. So when you think about your website, one of the things that I thinks really useful, for instance, that if you think about it particularly is at HQ, is your data feeds. So a lot of times when people think about data feeds, they think about eCommerce sites because an eCommerce site will have a feed of their products. And that's one of the ways that you can distribute it to lots of different channels. So you can distribute it to Instagram, to Facebook, you can distribute it to Amazon, wherever, where you're selling products, Google Merchant, et cetera. But there's also other content that also uses feeds. And if you organize the content on your website in that way, you can spread your net far and wide but consistently. So for instance, an RSS is a kind of data feed. It's old school, but it's a kind of data feed.

Mordy Oberstein:

I used to use it all the time. People rely on it all the time.

Crystal Carter:

All the time for podcasts. This podcast is distributed via an RSS feed. There's also Java feeds, Java sports will use a Java feed for instance, anything for other content, there's also things like that as well. So don't just think about, and you'll also, your YouTube videos. Those will also be distributed via an RSS feed.

So there's lots of different things there. So that's one that's really important. But also I think it's important to think about, if you Google now how search works, you'll actually get a little bar at the top that breaks it down and they say, what do you mean how search works on Google? Or how it works on Bing or how it works on Amazon or how it works on Meta or how it works on Yahoo because they know that users are searching in lots of different ways. And depending on which vertical you're in, it might not just be Google. That's their first port of call. I think for eCommerce in America, Amazon is actually the first place that people look for content or people look for shopping information. So if you're thinking about your brand as only being one channel, you're going to be missing a lot of opportunities

Mordy Oberstein:

For sure and it goes both ways. It goes in distributing out and pulling in. So the tldr, when you think of your website, not just as a way, okay, they're going from Google to my website, I need a place for them to land. I need something for Google to rank. But when you think of it a little more holistically, you're thinking about, this is the epicenter of all my digital marketing activity. So as you mentioned, right when it goes out, you need to have a place, you need to be able to distribute it out. But also when they come back in from the various channels, let's say you've done your distribution, now people are coming in from Instagram, they're coming in from YouTube, they're coming from the RSS feed, making sure that your website is constructed in a way that it speaks to those audiences the right way. For example, if you're pulling in tons of people from Instagram and they get to your website and it's essentially text based-

Crystal Carter:

Right, or not mobile first.

Mordy Oberstein:

Right, it's a complete disconnect.

Crystal Carter:

Yeah, it's complete disconnect. It's a complete waste of your efforts.

Mordy Oberstein:

But it happens all the time because people just think of their websites. Okay, my website is my website and I'm getting people from Google and social media is social media. It's not. Social media should connect back to your website and the audience that you're pulling in from searchall, from social. So I said, I just said search all that's amazing.

Crystal Carter:

You just invented that.

Mordy Oberstein:

But from social, not from searchall, but from social, it could be very different. The audience you're pulling in from search and you need to make sure that the website speaks to both at the same time, which goes back to a previous episode. You will link to the show notes of dealing with multiple intents on the same page and the same website.

Crystal Carter:

But it also goes back to the idea of thinking about the user journey. So I think that if you're planning to do multiple channels, make sure that you've explored what the journey is like for the customer coming from those different channels. We talked about Google Search Console recently. It's worth looking at your back links in Google Search Console. They aggregate them into different groups. So for instance, they'll say their top linking sites. And I looked on a site that wasn't commercial and for instance they had a bunch from Amazon and I was like, why do they have a bunch from Amazon? Well actually because their podcast was on Amazon Prime and it was being distributed that way. And also because other people were talking about their content or talking about their product on Amazon in different ways.

So look into your back links and Google Search Console, you can see a trend and you might see that there's a lot of people coming from channels that you weren't expecting them to be coming from. And if that's the case, then you can follow that journey, see where they're coming from and see whether they're letting on to something that's appropriate, whether they're landing on something that makes sense for them, makes sense for you, helps you build your brand.

Mordy Oberstein:

And that is consistent across the board. I think the second point we'll call that to consider where you're doing all of this, which you should be doing, is that whatever your messaging is, whatever your design is, where all the language that you're putting out, whether it be latent or manifest content, not to get too Freudian there needs to be consistent across all channels. So if you're posting on something on YouTube or on Instagram and it looks completely or sounds completely different once they get to the website, that's an enormous disconnect.

And I think it's a problem when you are so focused just on SEO, just on search, where you're writing in a certain way, which again, you shouldn't be doing it all together, but it kind of sometimes does happen where you're kind of writing for the search engine. One of the problems outside the fact that's not what gets you to rank well.

My opinion is that when people are coming from other channels and other mediums, it sounds off. Not only is it a negative and it sounds off, but it doesn't let you do a positive, which is to build an identity, to build a brand, to build up branding. So you have to be consistent and you have to think about how whatever from whatever channel and all channels, you should be consistent across the board in how you speak and how you present yourself, whether it be on social, whether it be on YouTube, or whether it be on the site itself through Google search,

Crystal Carter:

Even on Google, when people search for your brand, they are going to get lots of the content from these different channels pulling through at the same time. So if you are inconsistent, people will see it straight away. If you look up a restaurant review on Google for instance, you'll get content from the restaurant. You'll get content from Google business profile. You'll get content from TripAdvisor. You'll get content from other restaurant thing, Yelp. Things like that. You'll also get content from your Instagram, from your Facebook from that sort of thing. So if you have consistent brand positioning that will help you to be consistent across those things. And also help ensure that customers are having a consistent experience with you across both your digital and your IRL spaces.

And it can be difficult to do, but it's almost like when I talk about visual search, for instance, I say consistency is key. If somebody says, oh, let's change up the logo, don't. Is this the same with your branding? Pick something, stick with it, go with it for a while. If you think about Coca-Cola, they haven't changed your branding in years. If you think about Apple, I mean they changed their logo, but their vibe has been pretty much the same for, I don't know, 20 years.

Mordy Oberstein:

And it's not that you can't do it, but it's very much an uphill battle, which is really the point before you do SEO, before you do social media marketing, what you really fundamentally need to do is decide who you are, what you do, and how you go about doing it so that now you can just do all the things automatically. I've seen it so many times where on social, the brand position itself is one way. They're rather fun, they're vibrant and whatever. And then you get to the website and it looks very almost too professional for what they're trying to do and how they're trying to speak. And there's an enormous disconnect there. And I think that comes about because you have a social strategy, you have an SEO strategy, but you don't have an overall brand strategy. And that the brand strategy should be the other thing that should feed what you talk about and how you talk about it in a lot of ways. And there's tremendous amount of overlap between SEO, social, whatever it is, and what you're doing in the brand side.

Crystal Carter:

And I don't necessarily think that this means that SEO should take over social media from the social media managers. Social media managers have a very complicated job. But not all heroes wear capes. But social media managers really do the business. And I don't think we should necessarily take over, but we should be in conversation. The people who set the brand guidelines, who are doing the branding, designing, that sort of thing, who are putting together your brand kit, whatever, that sort of thing, they should be having a conversation. We shouldn't be siloed. These channels shouldn't be siloed. We should be working together.

Mordy Oberstein:

It should all be together. It all be about who you're targeting, how you're targeting them. So everybody needs to be on that from the get go, the SEO, the social media manager, the branding marketing manager, brand marketing manager, whatever, making it up as I go along here. Doesn't matter. That's how we roll.

Crystal Carter:

Is that your title?

Mordy Oberstein:

Yeah. Which I guess, actually, anyway. But it should all work together. And especially because, and this goes back to I guess how SEO works. It's a slow burn, especially when you're starting off. So you may get more traction initially on social media, on paid advertising on whatever platform it is. And then SEO only comes into in terms of earning into the picture six months to a year later. So you want to make sure you're consistent across the board because the social might be your main channel of income while you're waiting to start putting out more content and be able to start actually ranking.

Crystal Carter:

You can use one to support the other. If you see something that works well on your SEO, then you can put it on your social. If you see something that works well on your social, you can put it on your SEO, like on your content stuff.

Mordy Oberstein:

Everything.

Crystal Carter:

Yeah, bring it.

Mordy Oberstein:

But if you can't do it if it's not consistent, by the way, right, if it's not consistent. You can't repurpose it.

Crystal Carter:

Exactly, exactly. So I think there's lots of opportunities and Google's giving users a much more holistic, much more multimedia, much richer content experience all the time. So the more you are connected to multiple channels and that you are managing and actively involved in those multiple channels, the better you'll be positioned in this multimodal world that we're going into.

Mordy Oberstein:

Totally true. So if you're in SEO and you're listening to this, it's all one song. There's a famous story with Neil Young who's a singer back from the seventies, and there's a story where he was at a concert it was his concert, and someone yells out all your songs sound the same and he yells back, it's all one song.

It's all one song. So you as an SEO need to be involved with what's happening on social. You need to be how it's happening on the brand side. You need to be involved in what's happening on the content side. It should be obvious at this point because it's all one song. You need to understand how it's all working. What the messaging is going out is so that you can incorporate, repurpose, and deal with what you do the right way. Which brings us to prioritization because that's a lot.

Crystal Carter:

That's a lot.

Mordy Oberstein:

Now all of a sudden you started some little SEO corner over here and do my little SEO thing, but you're telling me, wait wait, it's more than that?

Crystal Carter:

Yeah. Do everything.

Mordy Oberstein:

Now do everything. All of a sudden now how do you prioritize it to help you? I pull ranks on one of my own personal SEO faves, Garrett Sussman. Garrett's going to answer for us, how do you prioritize your digital activity when working with multiple channels? Because he can't do it all at once. Take it away, Garrett.

Garrett Sussman:

Okay, so prioritizing your digital marketing activity is like this herculean task. I mean like SEO, it depends, right? You really have to understand because there's so many different types of businesses out there in terms of what your priority should be for an eCommerce site versus a news publisher versus a financial services or healthcare, your money, your life type of site. And then you have to take into consideration the size. We're talking like enterprise, where you have so many moving parts or if you have a one-person marketing team where you're doing everything, then you have to think about your integrated strategy. How are you working with the other channels? Where does SEO fit in your organization when it comes to ppc, social media, email marketing, you name it. Then working with your budget and your resources. Well, when you're talking about prioritization, it all comes back to revenue, right?

What is first going to require the least amount of work and resources and drive the biggest revenue or the biggest needle movers or the biggest KPI? The other thing to consider is long term strategy. You have to be flexible and agile. You can put a strategy in place and you want to knock it out piece by piece, but you also need to be able to move and flex and do whatever it takes. If market conditions change, like say, I don't know, a pandemic or I don't know a recession. Ultimately it's all tied back to your buyer's journey. Hitting all those different pieces of the funnel where it comes to awareness, familiarity, consideration, purchase, and ultimately retention. Well, purchase and retention.

So when it comes to how do you prioritize, because you can't do it all, think about what's going to move the needle, right? Think about your specific organization and your specific business metrics. Where is the revenue, and how can you impact it both in the short term and the long term? Because you're going to be making the business case and you're going to have to think about what's going to help your business the most. It's not easy and it depends. Context, planning, flexibility, move the needle revenue. Boom.

Mordy Oberstein:

Thank you, Garrett. And that's a really good point by the way. We also want to think about not just getting the people in but also retaining them and what all goes into that in terms of messaging and SEO and beyond SEO. So definitely consider not just bringing people in the leads, but also what you need to do across channel to retain them and maintain.

Crystal Carter:

He's absolutely talking on the money about money.

I think time is money and money is money. So to do all of the omnichannel stuff, it can take a lot of time. And he talked about businesses on different sites. He talked about marketers who wear many, many hats and who might have to do lots of the channels themselves, who might be building it themselves or might be managing the marketing themselves. And that situation, yeah time is absolutely money, even if it doesn't cost you necessarily to work on the content and move all of the things around. It's time that you could be spending doing other things. So think about what's going to get you in front of customers that matter. What's going to get you the reach that you need to do. If you're starting from nowhere, just go. If you've got nothing, then just go get things out. Like test, try again, try again, try again. His focus on commercial priorities is really, really important I think.

Mordy Oberstein:

And sometimes when you're starting out, just real quick point, you have the least resistance in getting some momentum and cadence might be the best way to go sometimes where you might think, okay, I need to do a ton of work to get a big thing out and then I'll eventually maybe earn some money from it. Whatever it is. That's one way to think about it. But thinking back, I need to get some momentum, I need to get rolling, I need to get started here. Let me take a smaller task and then a smaller, maybe slightly bigger then slightly bigger just to get momentum just to get going. There's something to consider also, not just what's the immediate value in terms of monetary income anyway. Okay, speaking of prioritizing, one of the best ways to help you prioritize is to better understand your audience, which in today's day and age, it's quite complicated. Well, to me it does start with empathizing and understanding intuitively who your audience is and what they're all about. You almost always want to have something there to help you just a little bit. One of the best tools out there around helping you better understand your audience is called SparkToro. So here's a little tool time around Spark Toro for your audience insights.

So SparkToro was founded by Rand Fishkin. Rand Fishkin, you may know him from Moz. He's the founder of Moz, which is one of the predominant SEO tools out there. So you'll start a tool called SparkToro which is an absolutely fabulous tool. They have a bunch of free tools and they have a paid subscription, obviously. And what they'll basically do is they'll give you insights to what is your audience talking about? Who a podcast of your audience listening to, what hashtags are they following, the people who follow the hashtags that are important to your audience, what are some of the things that are in their top words or in their bios on social media? All sorts of ways of go in and segment out who are the people that are interested in your product and what are they talking about and what are they interested in so you can better target them. And they have some really cool free things. For example, they have a cool Twitter tool which is totally free, that helps you better understand someone. So if you're doing influencer marketing, you want to better understand who that person is in terms of are people engaging with them? They might have a million followers, but are they actually engaging with anybody? Is anybody engaging with them? So they have a great tool there that'll help you better understand who those people are for your influencer marketing, which is one of the gazillion data insights that they have there.

Crystal Carter:

They're a great place to start if you're looking to do some outreach across different channels. Because I think that one of the other things that's particularly when we're talking about omnichannel marketing, when you think about social media, influencers are a big, big part of that. So if you are looking for influencers or even looking to see which channels are most important. So for instance, I've been working on a little project about women in space for instance, and if I wanted to find out where people are talking about that, which social accounts they're talking about, that I could type in that keyword and I can find hashtags that people are using hashtag Women history month for instance, and I could find different podcasts that they're looking at. I could find accounts that they follow. There's something called Huff Post Women. There's also Forbes Women. I didn't know that Forbes had a whole thing that. They've got Reddit accounts, they've got podcasts, they've got YouTube channels for instance, that people are talking about.

And they have a sort of freemium version where you can use their tool to see a few bits of insights. You can pay for more, but you can definitely get into it and get some really good insights for it. And actually there were tools that preceded this that I used previously whilst working agency side for building personas and things like that. But honestly, SparkToro is the tool to roll them all. It's much more holistic and it gives you lots of audience insights, for instance, very quickly. So you can see whether it's a big audience or whether it's very niche, you can also see some things about demographics around age and region for instance as well.

Mordy Oberstein:

I'll run it through for you so you get a better idea of what's actually in this. So let's say you search for drones, so you'll get top words and bios. So you'll have actual words that are in the bios of the people who are engine and drones. For example, 2.8% of these people and their bios have aerial photography. Which hashtags are used around drones? Hashtag drone photography 12% of the time you can see people are being engaged with. So for example, wish people have high engagement rates around drones or wish people have the most followers around drones. What websites are these people visiting? So you can really get a sort of 360 degree understanding of who your audience is and what they're interested in, which I think is the most important part, what this tool does differently than a lot of the other tools that have been out there in the past. So definitely check out SparkToro at SparkToro.com.

Crystal Carter:

Absolutely.

Mordy Oberstein:

Nice. Hey, if SparkToro is news to you. Here's some actual SEO news as we get into Snappy News.

Snappy News, snappy News, Snappy News. Google Discover is amazing. If you don't know what Google Discover is, well Google it and check it out. But now the reporting inside of Google's search console on Discover is getting more amazing as well per Barry Schwartz seoroundtable.com. Google improved the search console, discover Performance Reports. This goes back to November 28th. As of November 28th, your data inside of Google's search console on Google Discover is more accurate. So if you saw a spike with regards to Discover performance around November 28th, it might not be because you're showing up more often in the Discover Feed, but because the data is simply better. Which by the way just goes to show you no data source is, as I always say, 100% accurate. Data is a trend first and foremost. By the way, discovery is a great source of clicks if you get in and did a whole study on what shows up inside of Discover on so much a while back. So I'll link to that has shown us as well, definitely dive into Discover if you haven't, and it's a very cool option for you.

Okay, next up, local SEO legend, Joy Hawkins over at Sterling Sky did a little study asking, does the length of a Google Review matter? Turns out there is a strong correlation between how long the review is and how long Google shows it at the top of the business profile. So try to encourage longer reviews from your audience because the longer reviews tend to be the negative reviews. Because when we're angry, we write a lot. But when we're happy, we don't write a lot. So someone's happy with your business, try to find a way to incentivize them to leave as long of a review as possible. And with that, that is the snappiest of Snappy News.

Before we wrap up and to go kind of full circle, not really full circle, well I guess kind of full circle, the whole episode is full circle. We talked about multiple channels and SEO considering multiple channels and how to prioritize and a tool to help you find your audiences and what they're dealing with for multiple channels. And here's a great person-

Crystal Carter:

To bring us full circle in this holistic experience-

Mordy Oberstein:

Who is also part of SparkToro, amazingly enough. Right?

Crystal Carter:

It's amazing.

Mordy Oberstein:

This week's follow of the week, is the one of the only Amanda Natuda over at Twitter on A M A N D A N A T over on Twitter? So Amanda, Nat.

Crystal Carter:

Yes. You should absolutely follow her. She is fantastic. She's super smart, shares some incredibly smart insights. She's also really nice. I met her at MozCon in the summer and she's incredibly nice and just also very down to earth and amazing. And she's great because she talks a lot about how to grow your following on Twitter, for instance. So she's very strategic about it and she also makes sure that she shares lots of great insights. So she shares really good threads about content management. Yeah, about content management, about thinking about your audience, about that sort of thing.

She's also really funny. So she talks about, I remember there was something she tweeted about things I knew or things I've mastered since growing older, and one of them was like, how to eat a chicken bone without leaving any meat on it or something like that. They're really, really good conversation starters. She's not doing this for no reason. Like it's good, but it's, they're also really good conversation starters, and it's a way to keep connecting with your audience and to make sure that there's that human element to your branding and to the conversations that you have. And she's great.

Mordy Oberstein:

And that's all we're going to say about that for today, because what other way to end off with than she's great.

Crystal Carter:

She's Great. Great.

Mordy Oberstein:

So thank you for joining us on the Surf's Up podcast. Are you going to miss us? Not to worry. We're back next week with a new episode as we dive into the good, the bad, and the ugly of duplicate content. Look for it wherever you consume your podcast or on our SEO learning about wix.com/SEO/learn. Looking to learn more about SEO? Check out all the great content webinars on the Wix SEO Learning Hub at you guessed at wix.com/SEO/learn. Don't forget to give us a review on iTunes or a rating on Spotify. Until next time, peace, love, and SEO

Crystal Carter:

SEO.

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