When Photographers & Designers Team Up

Now Trending | May 21st 2012

One of the brilliant things that characterizes the web era is that it opened a huge spectrum of possible cooperations between creative minds. It is easier today to communicate, exchange ideas and inspire people more than ever before. Photography and design are a great example of two fields that have a lot to gain from an open dialogue with each other.

Working closely with both of these professional communities, we see how cooperations between photographers and designers can benefit both sides tremendously. Here are some of the advantages that a collaboration between the two have.

 

Providing Insights

Both designers and photographers deal with visual material as a way to convey a message, but that doesn’t mean they see images the same way. Sharing perspectives with each other can be very productive for both sides.

woman with pink circle

Image Source: Shutterstock

Designers use photographs as one element in creating their final product. If photographers are able to understand the design process better, they’ll  be able to create better images for web designers. This means more than just a regular briefing from one service provider to the other. It means that the photographer will be able to plan the shooting session while already understanding the prominence (or otherwise) of the photo in the overall design.

The designer, on the other hand, can benefit a great deal by maintaining a “photographer’s look” on things. Photographers observe and document situations, people, landscapes. Whatever artistic interpretation they may add to their work, at the core it remains an image that was seen by a human being. For a designer, working nowadays mainly with computer programs, keeping this real-life human perspective close is crucial. After all, design is consumed by the human eye.

 

Practical Mutual Efforts

Designers and photographers can help each other not only by offering new perspectives, but also by providing services to one another. These two fields rely on each other on a daily basis, so optimizing the mutual work flow definitely sits well in the interests of both sides.

Practical Mutual Efforts

The best example would be stock images. Photographers produce these generic photos for designers to use in their work. Every designer knows what it’s like to go through endless amounts of stock images without finding the one that they really need. That’s where a good photographer can come in handy and produce the photo according to a specific brief, or even manipulate an existing one at almost no effort.

An interesting start-up called Photo Beluga was born exactly out of this need. It connects photographers and designers (amongst others) with the objective of co-creating the perfect stock images. It’s a great example of how such collaborations can make things much easier for both sides. Designers get better pictures, photographers sell more photos – everybody wins!

Of course, photographers rely on designers’ skills to help them present and promote their work. Web design for photography has become a specialty in its own right, as photographers  have very unique needs as a business. On Wix, for instance, we have dozens of photography website templates. Photographers need to know that their images are in good hands when they decide to create an online portfolio.

Networking

Having a positive collaboration with a colleague makes for excellent PR.  A designer who worked closely with a specific photographer will be happy to further recommend that photographer to clients, and vice versa. Clearly, cultivating a closer working relationship with a small number of professionals from the “other side” can boost your business significantly.

computer wire as a cloud

Image Source: Shutterstock

In fact, many photographers and designers take this working relationship to the next level and open a studio together, where they can provide a one-stop-shop for their clients. This move cuts back on costs, improves the work flow and most importantly, brings in more work.




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