Your New Photography Client

November 9th 2010 | Photography

Your new photography clientPhoto By JERRY TREMAINE

Web designers often include photography as a line item in their estimates and budget proposals.

It’s true.

I see it all the time. Unfortunately, it’s a line item that says, iStock photo.

Web designers want quality photography.  Stock photography is easy and cheap. This is why you must make it easy to do business. This is why you need to offer great images that make cheap photography look cheap.

Network with designers and Web firms.  Develop an easy and understandable pricing plan.  A good per-image pricing plan will do the trick.  High hourly rates will scare and confuse them.  Businesses don’t want unknowns when developing a client estimate.

Working with you should be the path of least resistance. A path that makes the Web marketing team look really good.

Give them a list:

Standard executive portrait: $xxxx

Each additional image: $xxxx

Table top product on white: $xxxx

Each additional image: $xxxx

Stylized product photography $xxxx

Exterior architectural image: $xxxx

Interior architectural image: $xxxx

The above rates do not include props, models, and location fees. All photographs delivered within 72 of creation via Photoshelter gallery (or your favorite online delivery method).

An online gallery allows clients to download the images as needed, just like stock photography.

Consulting $ xxxx

Yes, consulting.

Many designers like to dabble in photography. Give them an easy option for the times when an assignment gets over their head or goes bad — you will be the helpful and friendly option to fix the issue and save the day.

Develop partnerships and create image samples for the design firm’s Web site.  A gallery of your work on their site builds loyalty and the ability to sell your photography as a part of their packages.

Thousands of quality professional Web sites costing $5,000 to more than $50,000 are developed every day. Making these sites look more customized and professional is worth an extra $500 to $2,500 or more. This is especially true if it earns the firm more business.

It’s not like the old days when you worked your way into a couple of advertising agencies or magazines to make a career. The work is still there, but now it’s housed in thousands of smaller design shops, marketing companies, and public relations firms.

This post was written by Rosh Sillars for “New Media Photographer” digital marketing Blog.




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