Photography Means Business. Choose Your Niche

Photography | June 16th 2010
Choose your photography niche

Photo by Paul Michael Hughes

As any photographer knows, there’s an immeasurable gap between a photographer’s talent and their ability to actually make a living from their photographs. After a photograph is produced, it’s no longer the art of photography that will decide its fate but the art of business.

The web, in 2010 is in constant transition offering many platforms for exposure and different revenue options, but consequently the competition intensifies as well. After designing your photography website It’s easy to get lost in the big ocean, you might find that you’re spreading yourself too thin. Focusing your efforts is like planting a seed and watching it grow. In the business of photography the seed is your niche.

The Niche

Creating your own specialty or specialties, if you have more then one, lets you stand out from the crowd. It gives you the title of an expert, setting you apart from the stock photo sites, which intimidate smalltime buyers looking for a single image. This is where you come in – choosing your niche is targeting your market. Your niche can still be wide, “business” or “nature” are two popular examples. If you succeed to dominate a niche, there’s a good chance you’ll start seeing a steady income. Your niche will help you focus while optimizing your photography website and helping you with SEO.

Your Website, Your Rules

As well as showcasing your work, your website allows you to skip over the middle man and sell your images directly using Wix’ shopping cart. Make sure your website is cleverly structured so clients can easily navigate and find what they’re looking for. If you’re a nature photographer, don’t throw in your Savanna and Yosemite photos into one gallery. Segmentation and categorizing work best.

Divide and Rule

If you happen to be offering a multitude of products and services you might consider creating more than one website. Separate, well defined, focused niches work better than one giant supermarket. For instance, Daniel and Rachel Ballard specialize in underwear photography. Their “single service” approach is a powerful one. It makes their clients feel they’re in good, dedicated and professional hands. If Daniel and Rachel were to expand their services to top model photography they’d require an additional website.

The point is that in order to succeed you need to create multiple revenue streams. These might range from nature to stock photography, postcards to prints, etc. The thing to avoid is creating a website that portrays you as Jack of all Trades (and master of none).

Rome wasn’t built in a day, starting a small successful photography business isn’t going to happen over night. It requires beautiful images, hard work and persistence. Use the web to your advantage; promote your photography website using your specific niche in relevant social networks and stock photography agencies. Your name will slowly spread through the web and the hard work will start paying off.

Here’s a collection of photography niche websites we assembled:

Niche photography - portraits

Paul Michael Hughes – portrait photography

Niche photography - nature

David Dickson – nature images

Niche photography - music

Rebecca Lee – music photography

Niche photography - fashion

Dean Stockings – fashion and portraits

Niche photography - photo journalism

Daniel Lupeto – photo journalism

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